Talk Talk
Talk Talk - writing some of the most timeless, intricate and original music ever is as impressive as the moon landings.

Talk Talk In session – 1983 – Past Daily Soundbooth

Talk Talk

Talk Talk – writing some of the most timeless, intricate and original music ever is as impressive as the moon landings.

Talk Talk – in session for Kid Jensen – March 27, 1983 – BBC Radio 1 –

Ending up the working week with Talk Talk, in session for Kid Jensen and recorded for BBC Radio 1 on March 27, 1983.

Via their Wikipedia Page (in case you don’t already know, or are getting up to speed):

Talk Talk began as a quartet consisting of Mark Hollis formerly from The Reaction (vocals/main songwriter), Lee Harris (drums), Paul Webb (bass guitar), and Simon Brenner (keyboards). In their early years they were often compared with Duran Duran. In addition to a band name consisting of a repeated word, the two shared a Roxy Music-inspired musical direction, as well as the same record label (EMI) and producer (Colin Thurston). The band also supported Duran Duran on tour in late 1981.
The band released their first single, “Mirror Man”, on EMI in February 1982. The single was not a great success, but was quickly followed by their self-titled single in April 1982 (a rerecording of a track by The Reaction) which reached No.52 in the UK. The band’s first album, titled The Party’s Over, was released in July 1982. The band had their first UK Top 40 hits with the singles “Today” (UK No. 14) and a re-release of “Talk Talk” (UK No. 23). These singles also were hits in other countries including Ireland, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. The re-release of the “Talk Talk” single reached the U.S. Top 75. The album was produced by Colin Thurston, who was Duran Duran’s in-house EMI producer at the time, but picked by Hollis because of his involvement with David Bowie’s Heroes.[7] It was a moderate success in the UK reaching No.21, and was later certified Silver by the BPI for sales of 60,000 copies by 1985. It was a Top 10 hit in New Zealand.[8]

They were introduced to a wider live audience in October 1982 when they supported Genesis at their reunion concert with original lead singer Peter Gabriel at Milton Keynes Bowl, England.

Brenner left after the 1983 non-LP hit single “My Foolish Friend”, which was produced by frequent Roxy Music collaborator Rhett Davies. At this point, Talk Talk was now a trio, as Brenner was never officially replaced. However, Tim Friese-Greene was recruited to assist with the recording of their second album, It’s My Life,[9] and he soon became the band’s producer as well as keyboardist and Hollis’ frequent songwriting partner. Although a major contributor to the band’s studio output and a de facto fourth member, Friese-Greene never officially joined the band; and as such did not regularly play with the touring band, and was absent from the band’s publicity material.

Crank it up and enjoy . . .loudly.

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