Jacqueline Francois
Jacqueline Francois - According to Charles Trenet - Jacqueline and the Microphone were made for each other.

Jacqueline Francois – Paris Radio – 1953 – Past Daily Nights At The Round Table

Jacqueline Francois

Jacqueline Francois – According to Charles Trenet – Jacqueline and the Microphone were made for each other.

Jacqueline Francois – C’est le Printemps (It Might As Well Be Spring) – W/Roger-Roger and his Orch. – ORTF-Paris – 1953 – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –

The legendary French chanteuse Jacqueline Francois to end the week. From a radio appearance in studio for ORTF, and accompanied by Roger-Roger and his orchestra, she sings C’es le Printemps (It Might As Well Be Spring), which she first recorded in 1947.

“The meeting of Jacqueline François and the microphone is a date in the history of the record, they were made for each other like two lovers who were looking for each other and from this meeting, these lovers, are born the most beautiful phrases that have never toyed with a song. » Charles Trenet

She is one of the great interpreters of French chanson, both on record and on stage, with a strong, passionate personality. The whole world, from France to North America and South America, through Russia and Japan, applauded Mademoiselle de Paris, which she recorded in 1948. This song was the first of what would be a string of hits. The young singer had the support of her record company and Paul Durand’s great orchestra had the best effect on the public, and Jacqueline François would be associated with this title all her life. It was and remains her musical signature. Over the years Jacqueline François has recorded this song several times with a host of different accompaniments and different arrangements.

Jacqueline François had always loved jazz, she recorded with Claude Bolling , Michel Legrand, Ivan Julien and took over American standards like Shiny Stockings , Lullaby Of Birdland , The Lady Is a Tramp , Too Close for Comfort and the song she sings tonight, a standard written by Rogers and Hammerstein . She had always taken an extreme care in the choice and the quality of her accompanists and the recordings of the works that she interpreted. Jacqueline Francois died on March 7, 2009.

Not a shabby way to end the week, wouldn’t you say?


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