Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999)

Joe DiMaggio - Cultural icon - Baseball legend.

March 8, 1999 – “Joltin’ Joe Has Left The Stadium” – Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999) – Final Curtain For Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999)

Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999)
Joe DiMaggio – Cultural icon – Baseball legend.
Download For $1.99: - March 8, 1999 - CBS World News Roundup - Gordon Skene Sound Collection

March 8, 1999 – CBS World News Roundup – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –

March 8, 1999 – A day of double loss to the world of Sports and the world of Cinema. Joe DiMaggio, Joltin’ Joe, Yankee Clipper, baseball legend, died earlier in the day at his home in Florida. He was 84. DiMaggio played his entire 13-year career in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees. Born to Italian immigrants in California, he is widely considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time, and had a 56-game hitting streak (May 15 – July 16, 1941), a record that still stands.

DiMaggio was a three-time Most Valuable Player Award winner and an All-Star in each of his 13 seasons. During his tenure with the Yankees, the club won ten American League pennants and nine World Series championships. His nine career World Series rings is second only to fellow Yankee Yogi Berra, who won ten.

At the time of his retirement after the 1951 season, he ranked fifth in career home runs (361) and sixth in career slugging percentage (.579). He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955 and was voted the sport’s greatest living player in a poll taken during baseball’s centennial year of 1969. His brothers Vince (1912–1986) and Dom (1917–2009) also were major league center fielders. DiMaggio is widely known for his marriage and lifelong devotion to Marilyn Monroe.

And there was Cinema legend Stanley Kubrick, who officially died the previous day (March 7), but was reported on this day. Kubrick was an American film director, producer, screenwriter, and photographer. He is frequently cited as one of the greatest filmmakers in cinematic history. His films, which are mostly adaptations of novels or short stories, cover a wide range of genres, and are noted for their realism, dark humor, unique cinematography, extensive set designs, and evocative use of music.

A demanding perfectionist, Kubrick assumed control over most aspects of the filmmaking process, from direction and writing to editing, and took painstaking care with researching his films and staging scenes, working in close coordination with his actors and other collaborators. He often asked for several dozen retakes of the same shot in a movie, which resulted in many conflicts with his casts. Despite the resulting notoriety among actors, many of Kubrick’s films broke new ground in cinematography. The scientific realism and innovative special effects of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) were without precedent in the history of cinema, and the film earned him his only personal Oscar, for Best Visual Effects. Steven Spielberg has referred to the film as his generation’s “big bang”; it is regarded as one of the greatest films ever made. For the 18th-century period film Barry Lyndon (1975), Kubrick obtained lenses developed by Zeiss for NASA, to film scenes under natural candlelight. With The Shining (1980), he became one of the first directors to make use of a Steadicam for stabilized and fluid tracking shots. While many of Kubrick’s films were controversial and initially received mixed reviews upon release—particularly A Clockwork Orange (1971), which Kubrick pulled from circulation in the UK following a mass media frenzy—most were nominated for Oscars, Golden Globes, or BAFTA Awards, and underwent critical reevaluations. His last film, Eyes Wide Shut, was completed shortly before his death in 1999 at the age of 70.

Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999)
Stanley Kubrick -leaving an indelible mark on Cinema.

There was other news, to be sure. But this March 8th had much to absorb – and it was all presented by The CBS World News Roundup.




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