Jackie McLean Sextet

Jackie McLean - Man of the bitter-sweet tone.

Jackie McLean Sextet – Live At The Village Vanguard – 1993 – Past Daily Downbeat.

Jackie McLean Sextet
Jackie McLean – Man of the bitter-sweet tone.

Jackie McLean Sextet – live at The Village Vanguard – December 10, 1993 – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –

The Jackie McLean Sextet this weekend. Recorded live at The Village Vanguard in New York on December 10, 1993. Joining Jackie are Steve Davis-trombone, Alan Palmer-piano, Nat Reeves-bass, Eric McPherson-drums and Ray Williams-trombone.

McLean’s early recordings as leader were in the hard bop school. He later became an exponent of modal jazz without abandoning his foundation in hard bop. Throughout his career he was known for a distinctive tone, akin to the tenor saxophone and often described with such adjectives as “bitter-sweet”, “piercing”, or “searing”, a slightly sharp pitch, and a strong foundation in the blues.

In 1962, he recorded Let Freedom Ring for Blue Note. This album was the culmination of attempts he had made over the years to deal with harmonic problems in jazz, incorporating ideas from the free jazz developments of Ornette Coleman and the “new breed” which inspired his blending of hard bop with the “new thing”: “the search is on, Let Freedom Ring”. Let Freedom Ring began a period in which he performed with avant-garde jazz musicians rather than the veteran hard bop performers he had been playing with previously. His adaptation of modal jazz and free jazz innovations to his vision of hard bop made his recordings from 1962 on distinctive.

McLean recorded with dozens of musicians and had a gift for spotting talent. Saxophonist Tina Brooks, trumpeter Charles Tolliver, pianist Larry Willis, trumpeter Bill Hardman, and tubist Ray Draper were among those who benefited from McLean’s support in the 1950s and 1960s. Drummers such as Tony Williams, Jack DeJohnette, Lenny White, Michael Carvin, and Carl Allen gained important early experience with McLean.

In 1970, he and his wife, Dollie McLean, along with jazz bassist Paul (PB) Brown, founded the Artists Collective, Inc. of Hartford, an organization dedicated to preserving the art and culture of the African Diaspora. It provides educational programs and instruction in dance, theatre, music and visual arts. The membership of McLean’s later bands were drawn from his students in Hartford, including Steve Davis and his son René, who is a jazz saxophonist and flautist as well as a jazz educator. Also in McLean’s Hartford group was Mark Berman, the jazz pianist and broadway conductor of Smokey Joe’s Cafe and Rent. In 1979 he reached No. 53 in the UK Singles Chart with “Doctor Jackyll and Mister Funk”. This track, released on RCA as a 12″ single, was an unusual sidestep for McLean to contribute towards the funk/disco revolution of the late 1970s. Many people, at the time, in the clubs where it was played confused the female singers on the track with his name thinking he was actually female.

He received an American Jazz Masters fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in 2001 and numerous other national and international awards. McLean was the only American jazz musician to found a department of studies at a university and a community-based organization almost simultaneously. Each has existed for over three decades.

McLean died on March 31, 2006, in Hartford, Connecticut after a long illness. In 2006, Jackie McLean was elected to the DownBeat Hall of Fame via the International Critics Poll. He is interred in Woodlawn Cemetery, The Bronx, New York City.

Turn up the volume and relax.




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