Captured U-Boat flag

Royal Navy presenting RAF with the captured U-Boat Flag. A first time for everything.

September 14, 1941 – Capturing A U-Boat From The Air

Captured U-Boat flag
Royal Navy presenting RAF with the captured U-Boat Flag. A first time for everything.

September 14, 1941 – News Of The World – Sunday News – NBC Blue Network – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –

September 14, 1941 – War news dominated the stories on this September 14, 1941. A Sunday, the broadcasts were filled with stories and reports from the previous week in War. At the top of the list was the story of a U-Boat capture from the air, from a fighter squadron patrolling the North Sea. When a German U-Boat surfaced, just long enough to be spotted by an RAF plane, an attack ensued and the U-Boat scrambled to submerge back into the waters. But the attack was persistent and it prevented the U-Boat from making a dive for potential safety. As the plane circled, continuing to target the ship, the crew made it clear to the attacking RAF plane that they were, in fact surrendering. Waving everything from t-shirts to white table tops, the U-Boat crew assembled on the deck of the ship, while the plane continued to circle, perplexed over what to do with a u-Boat crew surrendering to an airplane.

While the plane’s radio operator contacted home base, and the nearest ships in the area, the plane continued to circle for some three hours with rapidly diminishing fuel before relief from the air, and eventually warships arrived to pick up the German crew.

As news of this unorthodox surrender got back to home base, the Royal Navy rewarded the RAF squadron taking part in the capture, with the U-Boat’s flag as a gesture of thanks for a first, as well as full decorations for the officers of the Hudson Bomber making the capture.

In other news, the Air Ministry in London announced that a wing of the Royal Airforce arrived in Russia earlier this day. Although no details were given as to the actual number of planes were given to Russia, it was clear that, not only were there enough planes, but that those planes also brought their own ground crews with them.

And that’s a small slice of what was going on, this September 14, 1941, as reported over the Blue Network of NBC Radio.

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