Dizzy Gillespie - live in Paris - 1970

Dizzy Gillespie - One of bebop's most prominent symbols. And being one of its greatest helped too.

Dizzy Gillespie Quintet – Live In Paris – 1970 – Past Daily Downbeat

Dizzy Gillespie - live in Paris - 1970
Dizzy Gillespie – One of bebop’s most prominent symbols. And being one of its greatest helped too.

Dizzy Gillespie Quintet – live in Paris – Studio 104, Maison de la Radio – March 15, 1970 ORTF, Paris –

The legendary Dizzy Gillespie this weekend. With his quintet featuring George Davis, guitar – Mike Longo, piano – Red Mitchell, bass and David Lee Drums. It was all recorded and preserved by Radio France at Studio 104, Maison de la Radio on March 15, 1970.

In the 1940s, Gillespie, with Charlie Parker, became a major figure in the development of bebop and modern jazz. He taught and influenced many other musicians, including trumpeters Miles Davis, Jon Faddis, Fats Navarro, Clifford Brown, Arturo Sandoval, Lee Morgan, Chuck Mangione, and balladeer Johnny Hartman.

Scott Yanow wrote, “Dizzy Gillespie’s contributions to jazz were huge. One of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all time, Gillespie was such a complex player that his contemporaries ended up being similar to those of Miles Davis and Fats Navarro instead, and it was not until Jon Faddis’s emergence in the 1970s that Dizzy’s style was successfully recreated [….] Gillespie is remembered, by both critics and fans alike, as one of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all time”.

Gillespie has been described as the “sound of surprise”. The Rough Guide to Jazz describes his musical style:

The whole essence of a Gillespie solo was cliff-hanging suspense: the phrases and the angle of the approach were perpetually varied, breakneck runs were followed by pauses, by huge interval leaps, by long, immensely high notes, by slurs and smears and bluesy phrases; he always took listeners by surprise, always shocking them with a new thought. His lightning reflexes and superb ear meant his instrumental execution matched his thoughts in its power and speed. And he was concerned at all times with swing—even taking the most daring liberties with pulse or beat, his phrases never failed to swing. Gillespie’s magnificent sense of time and emotional intensity of his playing came from childhood roots. His parents were Methodists, but as a boy he used to sneak off every Sunday to the uninhibited Sanctified Church. He said later, “The Sanctified Church had deep significance for me musically. I first learned the significance of rhythm there and all about how music can transport people spiritually.”

Dig the show.




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